To understand a military veteran you must know... n/w sort of

STWall

Well-known member
I say sort of because we all know the affection we have for the armed forces given the incredibly generous donations at the Derby game. So I thought I'd share this with my Wall family on here, especially as we a few vets amongst us. This is from my network on LinkedIn.

To understand a Military Veteran you must know:

We left home as teenagers or in our early twenties for an unknown adventure.

We loved our country enough to defend it and protect it with our own lives.

We said goodbye to friends and family and everything we knew.

We learned the basics and then we scattered in the wind to the far corners of the Earth.

We found new friends and new family.

We became brothers and sisters regardless of colour, race or creed.

We had plenty of good times, and plenty of bad times.

We didn’t get enough sleep.

We smoked and drank too much.

We picked up both good and bad habits.

We worked hard and played harder.

We didn’t earn a great wage.

We experienced the happiness of mail call and the sadness of missing important events.

We didn’t know when, or even if, we were ever going to see home again.

We grew up fast, and yet somehow, we never grew up at all.

We fought for our freedom, as well as the freedom of others.

Some of us saw actual combat, and some of us didn’t.

Some of us saw the world, and some of us didn’t.

Some of us dealt with physical warfare, most of us dealt with psychological warfare.

We have seen and experienced and dealt with things that we can’t fully describe or explain, as not all of our sacrifices were physical.

We participated in time honoured ceremonies and rituals with each other, strengthening our bonds and camaraderie.

We counted on each other to get our job done and sometimes to survive it at all.

We have dealt with victory and tragedy.

We have celebrated and mourned.

We lost a few along the way.

When our adventure was over, some of us went back home, some of us started somewhere new and some of us never came home at all.

We have told amazing and hilarious stories of our exploits and adventures.

We share an unspoken bond with each other, that most people don’t experience, and few will understand.

We speak highly of our own branch of service, and poke fun at the other branches.

We know however, that, if needed, we will be there for our brothers and sisters and stand together as one, in a heartbeat.

Being a Veteran is something that had to be earned, and it can never be taken away.

It has no monetary value, but at the same time it is a priceless gift.

People see a Veteran and they thank them for their service.

When we see each other, we give that little upwards head nod, or a slight smile, knowing that we have shared and experienced things that most people have not.

So, from myself to the rest of the Veterans out there, I commend and thank you for all that you have done and sacrificed for your country.

Try to remember the good times and make peace with the bad times.

Share your stories.

But most importantly, stand tall and proud, for you have earned the right to be called a Veteran.

I’m a Veteran

We will remember them
 

Saxon Lion

Well-known member
I say sort of because we all know the affection we have for the armed forces given the incredibly generous donations at the Derby game. So I thought I'd share this with my Wall family on here, especially as we a few vets amongst us. This is from my network on LinkedIn.

To understand a Military Veteran you must know:

We left home as teenagers or in our early twenties for an unknown adventure.

We loved our country enough to defend it and protect it with our own lives.

We said goodbye to friends and family and everything we knew.

We learned the basics and then we scattered in the wind to the far corners of the Earth.

We found new friends and new family.

We became brothers and sisters regardless of colour, race or creed.

We had plenty of good times, and plenty of bad times.

We didn’t get enough sleep.

We smoked and drank too much.

We picked up both good and bad habits.

We worked hard and played harder.

We didn’t earn a great wage.

We experienced the happiness of mail call and the sadness of missing important events.

We didn’t know when, or even if, we were ever going to see home again.

We grew up fast, and yet somehow, we never grew up at all.

We fought for our freedom, as well as the freedom of others.

Some of us saw actual combat, and some of us didn’t.

Some of us saw the world, and some of us didn’t.

Some of us dealt with physical warfare, most of us dealt with psychological warfare.

We have seen and experienced and dealt with things that we can’t fully describe or explain, as not all of our sacrifices were physical.

We participated in time honoured ceremonies and rituals with each other, strengthening our bonds and camaraderie.

We counted on each other to get our job done and sometimes to survive it at all.

We have dealt with victory and tragedy.

We have celebrated and mourned.

We lost a few along the way.

When our adventure was over, some of us went back home, some of us started somewhere new and some of us never came home at all.

We have told amazing and hilarious stories of our exploits and adventures.

We share an unspoken bond with each other, that most people don’t experience, and few will understand.

We speak highly of our own branch of service, and poke fun at the other branches.

We know however, that, if needed, we will be there for our brothers and sisters and stand together as one, in a heartbeat.

Being a Veteran is something that had to be earned, and it can never be taken away.

It has no monetary value, but at the same time it is a priceless gift.

People see a Veteran and they thank them for their service.

When we see each other, we give that little upwards head nod, or a slight smile, knowing that we have shared and experienced things that most people have not.

So, from myself to the rest of the Veterans out there, I commend and thank you for all that you have done and sacrificed for your country.

Try to remember the good times and make peace with the bad times.

Share your stories.

But most importantly, stand tall and proud, for you have earned the right to be called a Veteran.

I’m a Veteran

We will remember them
ST, I and all the other veterans on here will see themselves in your verse, so thank you for that from us all, and you being a veteran makes it all the better. Cheers mate.
 

The Den

Well-known member
Respect any vet or current serving forces.

I listened to Craig Harrison podcast at the beginning of the week, he held the longest sniper shot, the suffering, grief and torment he still has and feels to this day is not healthy. The help afterwards is non existent it seems, eye opening podcast to say the least.

So to any Veteren, or any member of our armed forces, black white brown or blue, respect has no colours, Thank You.
 

STWall

Well-known member
ST, I and all the other veterans on here will see themselves in your verse, so thank you for that from us all, and you being a veteran makes it all the better. Cheers mate.
Saxon, I don't know if you know Jon White but I met him when he gave a speech like this at an event I was at in 2016. He had both his legs and his right arm blown off by stepping on an IED in Afghanistan. The anger, resentment and a raft of similar emotions were to be expected, and he came to the conclusion that the only way to stop carrying that hurt with him in his life was to forgive the two men who made the IED. I spoke to him after his address about how he released the hold it had on him and how he carried the torment with him until forgiveness. He's since led an extraordinarily successful life given his disability. A truly inspiring young man and Marine who came back even stronger from adversity. Watch this mate as I can assure you it's definitely worth your time.

 

hogeyman

Moderator
Staff member
Saxon, I don't know if you know Jon White but I met him when he gave a speech like this at an event I was at in 2016. He had both his legs and his right arm blown off by stepping on an IED in Afghanistan. The anger, resentment and a raft of similar emotions were to be expected, and he came to the conclusion that the only way to stop carrying that hurt with him in his life was to forgive the two men who made the IED. I spoke to him after his address about how he released the hold it had on him and how he carried the torment with him until forgiveness. He's since led an extraordinarily successful life given his disability. A truly inspiring young man and Marine who came back even stronger from adversity. Watch this mate as I can assure you it's definitely worth your time.

Incredible bloke
 

Gorgie Lion

Well-known member
Your Local Regiment is part of your family.
I grew up in Midlothian.
My cousins husband served in the Royal Scots fought in Aden and Kenya.
One of my best friends served in the Royal Scots him and 2 of his comrades died in Northern Ireland.
In WW1 the players of Heart of Midlothian all joined the Royal Scots.
Hearts are my team.
It is the same the length and breadth of the U.K.
Your local Regiment is family
 

heh-now

Well-known member
I say sort of because we all know the affection we have for the armed forces given the incredibly generous donations at the Derby game. So I thought I'd share this with my Wall family on here, especially as we a few vets amongst us. This is from my network on LinkedIn.

To understand a Military Veteran you must know:

We left home as teenagers or in our early twenties for an unknown adventure.

We loved our country enough to defend it and protect it with our own lives.

We said goodbye to friends and family and everything we knew.

We learned the basics and then we scattered in the wind to the far corners of the Earth.

We found new friends and new family.

We became brothers and sisters regardless of colour, race or creed.

We had plenty of good times, and plenty of bad times.

We didn’t get enough sleep.

We smoked and drank too much.

We picked up both good and bad habits.

We worked hard and played harder.

We didn’t earn a great wage.

We experienced the happiness of mail call and the sadness of missing important events.

We didn’t know when, or even if, we were ever going to see home again.

We grew up fast, and yet somehow, we never grew up at all.

We fought for our freedom, as well as the freedom of others.

Some of us saw actual combat, and some of us didn’t.

Some of us saw the world, and some of us didn’t.

Some of us dealt with physical warfare, most of us dealt with psychological warfare.

We have seen and experienced and dealt with things that we can’t fully describe or explain, as not all of our sacrifices were physical.

We participated in time honoured ceremonies and rituals with each other, strengthening our bonds and camaraderie.

We counted on each other to get our job done and sometimes to survive it at all.

We have dealt with victory and tragedy.

We have celebrated and mourned.

We lost a few along the way.

When our adventure was over, some of us went back home, some of us started somewhere new and some of us never came home at all.

We have told amazing and hilarious stories of our exploits and adventures.

We share an unspoken bond with each other, that most people don’t experience, and few will understand.

We speak highly of our own branch of service, and poke fun at the other branches.

We know however, that, if needed, we will be there for our brothers and sisters and stand together as one, in a heartbeat.

Being a Veteran is something that had to be earned, and it can never be taken away.

It has no monetary value, but at the same time it is a priceless gift.

People see a Veteran and they thank them for their service.

When we see each other, we give that little upwards head nod, or a slight smile, knowing that we have shared and experienced things that most people have not.

So, from myself to the rest of the Veterans out there, I commend and thank you for all that you have done and sacrificed for your country.

Try to remember the good times and make peace with the bad times.

Share your stories.

But most importantly, stand tall and proud, for you have earned the right to be called a Veteran.

I’m a Veteran

We will remember them
well said mate